13 Best Board Games for Kids (Fun With the Family)

Best board games for kids enhance relationships between family members, livening up family gatherings, banishing boredom, and a great way to pass the time. They also play a vital role in the overall academic well-being of children. The vitality of board games differs according to the diversity in the kids’ ages and reasons for playing. For instance, preschoolers learn the necessary skills of focusing, following rules, turn-taking, and enhanced creativity. Other than that, kids also get to enjoy quality time with their caregivers, and this leads them away from addictive video games and cartoon programs.

Regardless of the kind of board games you choose to engage your kids in, at the end of it all, kids acquire decision-making skills. These allow them to thrive in their respective societies.

Below are some great board games for your young ones;

More than two people can play these kinds of board games and are suitable for preschoolers and kids aged between eight to nine. That, however, does not mean that older kids can not enjoy it. Uno brings to play the concentration of an individual. School-going children, as well as preschoolers, are required to pay attention and truly immerse all their thoughts and energies into the cards and the game in general. By choosing to play the same color or character, their attention and focus skills are sharpened.

Besides that, pattern recognition and reasoning are enhanced. Inevitably, with time, kids learn logic and strategy by having to decide which card to lay down now and which one to save for the next turn to emerge a winner.

How it is played

The deck of 108 cards is well shuffled before the cards are distributed. Each player is given seven cards. The other cards are placed in a pile in a central place, and one of them is picked and turned over. The card that faces up is the start of the discard pile, the larger pile being the one you draw cards from.

Each player is then required to put down a card that has either the same color or number as the card on the discard pile. In the deck, there are wild cards, alongside other cards that force a player to skip his/her turn or draw more cards depending on the command on the card. The winner is whoever lays down all his/her cards. 

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The mastermind is a great game that aims at boosting memory and deductive skills of the young players.

How it is played

In this game, each player is equipped with several animal tiles together with a tower that they are required to mound together, making sure that their opponents don’t see. The opponents then take turns asking each other simple questions. Here, they need to guess their opponent’s order of arrangement of the tiles. The objective here is to break your opponent’s code in the fewest number of turns possible.

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This game can be tailored to suit preschoolers who still don’t understand or know their letters or numbers. It puts their memory and visual skills to work. Bingo comes in different shapes, colors, and sizes. This array allows you as a parent to purchase one that fits your preference as well as the age of your little one. 

Alternatively, you can choose to cut out photos and shapes of things you know fascinate your little one from catalogs. Older kids can play the classic version with letters and numbers.

Check out this BINGO set we found just for you and your kids.

Gameplay

Each player is given a pile of tokens and a card that is divided into a 25-square grid with 24 numbers. There is also a blank that reads the name of the game (Bingo).

Whoever is playing picks out a card (that has both a letter and a number) from a basket. The player then calls out to the rest of the members. For instance, he/she could call “B-7, I- 6, N-12 or G-4 “. Whoever fills up a row with the tokens shouts “Bingo” and emerges the winner.

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This classic combat game of battleship is designed for kids at the age of seven and above. It encompasses foldable and potable cases that allow one to play it wherever, whenever. It encourages creativity and analytical thinking.

How it is played

It involves only two players, and the objective is to safely and strategically hide their ships and hope that their opponent doesn’t find them before you’re able to find all of theirs (opponent’s).

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This game is suited to preschoolers of between three and four years of age as it emphasizes on colors and shapes. It encourages creativity and concentration.

How it is played

With multiple different ways to play, Colorama can be used for quite a long period (even after the kids get to a school-going age). This game takes about twenty minutes or more to play. Depending on the rules set, the players are encouraged to roll to find the color and shape that they then will either match with on the board or take a piece off the board.

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Monopoly is not just your ordinary board game. This game brings your flexibility to play. It not only tests one’s patience but also teaches them to be patient. It calls for persistence, and all this makes playing it a worthwhile exercise. The randomness in its verdicts teaches kids how to adapt to the sudden changes in life. It also brings to perspective, as early as it may be, the aspects of financial saving. It is best for kids who have already mastered the basics in life.

How it is played

The objective of this game is to become the wealthiest player by bankrupting your opponents. So, players compete in accruing as much play-money as possible, buying a property, and putting up as many new structures as possible. As the game goes on, cards have a chance to change a player’s financial luck. The wealthiest player with the most accrued play money is the winner.

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This a perfect game for players aged four and above who can understand its objective. Preschoolers love this game. It is effective in bringing to light cause and effect. It also encourages coordination between the hand and eye as well as sharpening planning skills.

Check out Yeti in My Spaghetti game here!

How it is played

As a moderator, you place noodles across a bowl, then add the Yeti on top, then encourage the young ones to take turns in removing a noodle one at a time. The first person to make the Yeti fall is the loser.

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Anyone in the family can play this game. It is quite strategic and cooperative. The game is unique, with an interesting design and an engaging ground that can be addictive. It is not a win-lose game. 

How it is played

Players are needed to work together as a team to save humanity from deadly diseases that threaten the world. This manages to engage the players for more than forty-five minutes, thus calls for proper planning and scheduling.

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This is another fun board game that can be enjoyed, especially by preschoolers. The Cupcake Party Game involves tapping into the little ones’ imagination and connectivity skills. It is suitable for preschoolers who can’t quite read yet as it only involves pictures. It can be played and enjoyed by both parents and kids.

How it is played

This very cooperative game requires that the players take turns in receiving instructions on what exactly needs to be done to put a cupcake (or whatever object is being used) on the table.

The instruction on the spin could be anything ranging from taking actions that should be honored to doing more mundane activities. These actions could require one to dance, name a particular food, or whatever action stated.

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Charades usually are great board games for laughs, and the kids’ version is not any different.

It not only taps into the little ones’ imaginations but also allows them to have their brains running and active the entire day actively. It comes in cards, each with a picture that makes it possible for preschoolers to play comfortably.

How it is played

Those who completely can’t read have the option of acting out the picture on the card, while those who can at least read have word options to choose from. The rest of the crew is then left to guess what was acted out and whoever gets most right emerges the winner. While the rest of the team members are not allowed to see what the card states or depicts, a moderator is.

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This exciting game aims at getting all the players a step ahead of the game character. It is a cooperative that enhances imagination and teamwork and is suitable for a preschooler as well as any member of a family. It is a lovable game that should certainly be tried out.

How it is played

Players are encouraged to try to pick their wooden variety of fruit from the trees before the mischievous opponents can steal them.

The fascinating thing about Haba Orchard is that it comes with cute little baskets for collecting the wooden fruits.

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This game comes with nine six-sided cubes, all of which have a sketch on one side. This sketch could be anything from keys to eyes, balloons, or any other object. This is not a winning game but rather a bonding and imaginative one.

How it is played

Players are required to roll the cubes and make up a story based on the sketches that appear face up. The creativity skills of the kids are enhanced as they learn to create stories and join gaps by turning something imaginative to a sensible piece as per their perspectives.

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Scrabble hinges on creating words on a board. It is suitable for already school-going kids who are on the verge of mastering word spelling and vocabularies. It also can be enjoyed by older members of the family. Two to four players per round can play it. The objective here is to grow one’s vocabulary range.

Scrabble comes with a board, four tile racks, and wooden letter tiles.

How it is played

The players are given a certain number of tiles with which they are required to create words on the board. They earn points from building words off existing ones. These could be double or triple words.

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When selecting a game, you must choose one that speaks to your kids’ strengths as well as their imagination and creativity. Also, with their age in mind, choose one that will help them build up new skills such as coloring, letter, or number recognition. You can also go the extra mile and consider big outdoor movements like hopping.

When children are young, engaging them in board games teaches them to socially interact and be comfortable around people as they easily learn to communicate and verbally share their joys and frustrations. With such, you can easily filter your baby’s strengths, weaknesses, and fears and help them conquer them as early in life possible. Board games also equip them with rule-following techniques that are practically essential in life beyond the gaming space.

Thank you for reading! Let us know in the comments below which board games are your favorites to play with your children. How competitive do you guys get at home?!

Check out related articles like “7 Tips To Make Your Baby Stop Crying With Ease” or “Things To Know Before Looking For A Babysitter” for full guides and info on improving and becoming an even greater mother.

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